Three reasons why Windows Server and SQL Server customers continue to choose Azure

On average, AWS is 5X more expensive for Windows Server and SQL Server users looking to move to the cloud.

However, these savings do not come at the expense of quality. Azure offers a uniquely functional hybrid cloud, perfect for that period of transition from your on-premises servers to the cloud and built-in top-of-the-line security and compliance.

Here at R.B.Hall Associates, LLC, we believe the cloud should be available to everyone. It’s easier than you think! Contact us to learn more.

For the past 25 years, companies of every size have trusted Windows Server and SQL Server to run their business-critical workloads. In fact, more than 70 percent of on-premises server workloads today run on Windows Server.

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Announcing new options for SQL Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 End of Support

We get it. Change is scary. If you’ve been running the same operating system for many years, a large-scale overhaul is understandably intimidating.

But it’s time. To continue their focus on progress and innovation, Microsoft is ending support for some popular 2008 products, including SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2.

If you are still running either of these, don’t panic! Microsoft has put options in place to give you the time you need, and we at R.B.Hall Associates, LLC, are here to assist you with a smooth transition. Check out this article and contact us for more information.

This article outlines the end of support timeline for SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2, as well as options and recommendations for current users moving forward.

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Use technology to foster collaboration in your office

At R.B.Hall Associates, LLC, we know the processes you need to build out a more collaborative office haven’t necessarily changed from what you experienced in the past, but the technology that enables collaboration certainly has. That’s why we work hard to bring you the latest tools for your organization to collaborate in the digital marketplace.

Office 365 empowers you to collaborate how you want and manage changes in shared documents, whether you’re working offline, online, or simultaneously with others.

Isn’t it time you incorporate a technology built around collaboration into your organization? R.B.Hall Associates, LLC is here to help. Contact us to find out more.

You don’t have to be an IT guru to know that the tools you use to collaborate change every day. Keeping up with that technology is another story. Office 365 makes it easy to keep your networks and teams connected with simplified infrastructure and advanced communication tools.

But best of all, it’s constantly upgrading to incorporate the latest technology, so you can focus on achieving more.

Check out this article to learn more about how you can improve your collaboration.

View: Use technology to foster collaboration in your office

The Value Of Cloud Computing

Author: bertro

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Why is cloud computing the newest buzz term? What value does it bring to organizations? “It’s become the phrase du jour. The problem is that (as with Web 2.0) everyone seems to have a different definition. The “cloud” is obviously a metaphor for the internet but when you add in the term “computing” the whole phrase gets muddy. However, when you think of the needs of an organizations IT structure it starts to become clearer. The concept of cloud computing is a way to increase capacity or add capabilities on the fly without investing in new infrastructure, training new personnel, or licensing new software. Cloud computing encompasses any subscription-based or pay-per-use service that, in real time over the Internet, extends IT’s existing capabilities. Cloud computing is location-independent computing, whereby shared servers provide resources, software, and data to computers and other devices on demand. Cloud computing describes a new supplement, consumption, and delivery model for IT services based on the Internet, and it typically involves over-the-Internet provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources. It is a by product and consequence of the ease-of-access to remote computing sites provided by the Internet. This frequently takes the form of web-based tools or applications that users can access and use through a web browser as if it were a program installed locally on their own computer. Most cloud computing infrastructures consist of services delivered through common centers and built on servers. Clouds often appear as single points of access for consumers’ computing needs. Commercial offerings are generally expected to meet quality of service (QoS) requirements of customers, and typically include service level agreements (SLAs). There’s a good chance you’ve already used some form of cloud computing. If you have an e-mail account with a Web-based e-mail service like Hotmail, Yahoo! Mail or Gmail, then you’ve had some experience with cloud computing. Instead of running an e-mail program on your computer, you log in to a Web e-mail account remotely. The software and storage for your account doesn’t exist on your computer — it’s on the service’s computer cloud. The applications of cloud computing are practically limitless. With the right middle-ware, a cloud computing system could execute all the programs a normal computer could run. Potentially, everything from generic word processing software to customized computer programs designed for a specific company could work on a cloud computing system. Why would anyone want to rely on another computer system to run programs and store data? Here are just a few reasons:

  • Clients would be able to access their applications and data from anywhere at any time. They could access the cloud computing system using any computer linked to the Internet. Data wouldn’t be confined to a hard drive on one user’s computer or even a corporation’s internal network.
  • It could bring hardware costs down. Cloud computing systems would reduce the need for advanced hardware on the client side. You wouldn’t need to buy the fastest computer with the most memory, because the cloud system would take care of those needs for you. Instead, you could buy an inexpensive computer terminal. The terminal could include a monitor, input devices like a keyboard and mouse and just enough processing power to run the middleware necessary to connect to the cloud system. You wouldn’t need a large hard drive because you’d store all your information on a remote computer.
  • Corporations that rely on computers have to make sure they have the right software in place to achieve goals. Cloud computing systems give these organizations company-wide access to computer applications. The companies don’t have to buy a set of software or software licenses for every employee. Instead, the company could pay a metered fee to a cloud computing company.
  • Servers and digital storage devices take up space. Some companies rent physical space to store servers and databases because they don’t have it available on site. Cloud computing gives these companies the option of storing data on someone else’s hardware, removing the need for physical space on the front end.
  • Corporations might save money on IT support. Streamlined hardware would, in theory, have fewer problems than a network of heterogeneous machines and operating systems.
  • If the cloud computing system’s back end is a grid computing system, then the client could take advantage of the entire network’s processing power. Often, scientists and researchers work with calculations so complex that it would take years for individual computers to complete them. On a grid computing system, the client could send the calculation to the cloud for processing. The cloud system would tap into the processing power of all available computers on the back end, significantly speeding up the calculation.

As you can see cloud computing is here to stay even with the current debate on security and intellectual property. There are so many tangible benefits to it . In a future post, I will discuss how we as software engineers can benefit from this.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/information-technology-articles/the-value-of-cloud-computing-4169450.html

About the Author

Jim Roberts

Currently, I am a lead classic ASP/ASP.NET/C# software developer with years of industry experience. I have worked in the higher education, insurance and the utilities industry. Software development can be such a cool industry to work in. I want to make it better. Find me at http://happydeveloper.blogspot.com/

The awesome evolution of the internet [infographic]

The awesome evolution of the internet [infographic]. What will the future hold for this form of communication?